Category: Encyclopedia of the Eye

EYE COLOBOMA

EYE COLOBOMA

Coloboma is a term used to evaluate some part of the eye as incomplete, missing one part, usually as a result of incomplete formation during embryonic development. So we have the eyelid coloboma, iris coloboma, intraocular lenses coloboma, the choroid (horioidee) coloboma and optic nerve coloboma. Eyelid coloboma is a triangular lack of eyelid tissue, […]

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Irregularly thickened temporal artery

GIANT CELL OR TEMPORAL ARTERITIS

Giant cell arteritis is a systemic vasculitis that can affect any artery, but mostly those are superficial temporal (temporal arteritis), ophthalmic, or vertebral arteries. Typically it affects people older than 60 years.   Irregularly thickened temporal artery Symptoms: Headache, sore scalp tenderness, pain when chewing, increased sedimentation rate (above 50 mm) and the complex of rheumatic […]

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PROGRESSIVE MYOPIA

The size of a refractive error in the progressive myopia is from -7 D to more than -30 D, with an error that increases gradually, that is, it progresses throughout life due to the continued growth of the eyeball. Progressive myopia is an inherited degenerative disease that affects almost all parts of the eye. It […]

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COLOR VISION DEFECTS

COLOR VISION DEFECTS

Disorders of color vision can be roughly divided into congenital and acquired. Congenital defects are almost always in the red-green area (they are found in 8% of men and 0.5% of women and are inherited mostly X-recessive), and acquired are mostly in the blue-yellow field and affect both sexes equally.   Furthermore, congenital disorders were […]

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FRONT ISCHEMIC OPTIC NEUROPATHY

FRONT ISCHEMIC OPTIC NEUROPATHY

This is an ischemic myocardial of the optic nerve in the lamina cribrosa. It typically affects people older than 60 years with vascular disease (atherosclerosis, temporal arteritis). Retro bulbar or rear ischemic optic neuropathy is much rarer than the front.   Prognosis for vision is poor. Usually after the withdrawal of disc edema, an optical […]

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OPTIC NERVE ATROPHY

OPTIC NERVE ATROPHY

Any damage to the optic nerve fibers causes its atrophy, i.e., degeneration of nerve fibers and their myelin sheaths. The causative agent can act on the optic nerve in any part of its neurons, that is – from the retina to corpus geniculatum laterale.     Symptoms: Signs of optic atrophy are reduced visual acuity […]

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asteriod

DYSTROPHIC CHANGES OF THE VITREOUS

Asteroid hyalose   It is the presence of tiny white solid corpuscles dispersed in an otherwise normal vitreous. It is a dystrophic change that does not require treatment or makes significant interference. Scintilating synhesia (holesterolosis of the eyeball) It is seen as bright holster crystals that float freely in the vitreous. Their appearance is due […]

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DEGENERATIVE CHANGES OF THE VITREOUS

  Aging is accompanied by significant physical and biochemical changes in the vitreous. The most important changes are syneresis and ablation of the posterior vitreous. Syneresis is vitreous liquefaction, possibly caused by the disappearance of hyaluronic acid. Ablation of the posterior vitreous membrane patient notes as a dark circle or the letter C in the […]

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GLAUCOMA

GLAUCOMA

Glaucoma is a disease characterized by periodic or persistent elevated intraocular pressure, damage to the optic nerve and visual field deterioration, and as a result of disease it is also possible that blindness occurs. It is one of the major causes of amblyopia in people older than 40 years.   In his beginning glaucoma has […]

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